Courses

Undergraduate

 

MIS 325. Health Care Informatics Programming. 3 Hours.

TThe course covers fundamental principles, concepts, and methods of computing, with emphasis on applications in the Health Care Informatics area. This course includes problem solving and programming techniques; fundamental algorithms and data structures; use of computers in solving health care delivery related problems. This course also introduces the student to software literacy that has become indispensable for creative work in Science and Engineering.

 

MIS 352. Principles of Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

(CBM core course) Introduces students to fundamental concepts in management information systems (MIS), the role of computers in MIS, and some details of how the computer functions. Topics include various types of information systems, use of information by management, and information systems applications. The students will also be exposed to the application of MIS technologies in the development of business solutions through end user computing and topics such as computer hardware and software, operating systems, and security. Course Information: Enrollment requires completion of at least 48 hours of college level coursework. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 370. Topics in Management Information Systems. 1-4 Hours.

An advanced topic from the current literature of MIS. May be repeated for an indefinite number of hours, but particular topics must differ. Course Information: Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 371. Enterprise Architecture. 3 Hours.

This course explores the design, selection, implementation, and management of enterprise IT solutions. The focus is on applications, infrastructure, and their fit with the business. Students learn frameworks and strategies for infrastructure management, system administration, data/information architecture, content management, middleware, software selection, total cost of ownership calculation, and IT investment analysis. Access to the Internet is required. Course Information: Prerequisite: CSC 275 or equivalent.

 

MIS 385. Data and Information Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. Core skills of identifying organizational information requirements, conceptual data, modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models and verifying its structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database using an industrial-strength database using management system. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 395. Electronic Business Strategy, Architecture, and Design. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the linkage between organizational strategy and networked information technologies to implement a rich variety of business models in the national and global contexts connecting individuals, businesses, governments and other organizations to each other. The course provides an introduction to e-business strategy and the development and architecture of e-business solutions and their components. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 454. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Hours.

The course covers a systematic methodology for analyzing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, computer-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solut8ion, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages. Alternative design, development, and implementation methodologies are discussed. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352 and MIS 385. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 455. Human-Computer Interaction Design. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), an interdisciplinary field that integrates cognitive psychology, design, information systems, and others. Examining the human factors associated with information systems. The course provides students with knowledge to understand the influence of usability in the acceptance of information systems. This course will examine concepts, guidelines, and principles of HCI.

 

MIS 456. Networks and Telecommunications in Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking requirements including networking and telecommunications technologies, hardware, and software. Emphasis is upon the analysis and design of networking applications in organizations. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis, and evaluation of connectivity options are covered. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 458. IS Project Management. 3 Hours.

This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques, and tools that organizations use to manage their information systems projects. The course covers a systematic methodology for initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects. This course assumes that project management in the modern organization is a complex team-based activity where various types of technologies (including project management software, as well as software to support group collaboration) are an inherent part of the project management process. This course also acknowledges that project management involves both the use of resources from within the firm, as well as contracted from outside the organization. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352 and BUS 322. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 468. Business Process Management. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to key concepts and approaches to business process management and improvement. The main focus of this course is both understanding and designing business processes. Students will learn how to identify, document, model, assess, and improve core business processes. Students will be introduced to process design principles. The way in which information technology can be used to manage, transform, and improve business processes is discussed. Students will be exposed to challenges and approaches to organizational change, domestic and offshore outsourcing, and inter-organizational processes. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 352. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 469. IS Strategy Management and Acquisition. 3 Hours.

This course explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems function in organizations and how the IS function integrates/supports/enables various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a senior management perspective exploring the acquisition, development, and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course addresses issues relating to defining the high-level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative, and strategic needs of the organization. Course Information: Prerequisite or co-requisite: All MIS required courses. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 470. Advanced Topics in Management Information Systems. 1-3 Hours.

An advanced topic from the current literature of MIS. May be repeated for an indefinite number of hours, but particular topics must differ. Course Information: Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 478. Health Care Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

This course covers technical and managerial security issues in generation, storage, and access of healthcare information. Technical issues include threats, vulnerabilities, and controls in healthcare information systems. Managerial issues include risk management, security planning, disaster recovery, legal and ethical issues, such as privacy and confidentiality of patient information. Course Information: Prerequisites: MIS 352.

 

MIS 499. Tutorial. 1-3 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: Access to the Internet is required.

 

 

Graduate

 

MIS 502. Technical Foundations of Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Introduces details of computer hardware and software technologies necessary for information systems professionals. Particular hardware architectures (CISC, RISC), operating systems fundamentals, and concepts of mobile application development will be described. Programming skills for mobile applications will be developed. Course Information: Prerequisite: Proficiency or coursework in a high level programming language such as Java, C++, Visual Basic, COBOL, C Fortran, etc. Access to the Internet is required. Restricted to graduates.

 

MIS 513. Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for understanding and analyzing information in organizations. Fundamental concepts of systems and information are covered. Topics include computer-based information systems, user requirements, and analysis and specification of systems requirements, life cycle, and security. Course Information: Open to non-majors. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 523. Managerial Decision Support Systems. 3 Hours.

Covers a variety of related decision support systems topics. Gives participants a flexible definition of DSS technology and introduces some principles of DSS design and use. Equips students with fundamental concepts and techniques of expert systems. Special emphasis is placed on microcomputer-based decision support systems. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513 or equivalent, and one semester of production operations management. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 525. Information Technology Management. 3 Hours.

Familiarity with a broad range of managerial as well as technical issues, technologies, and terminologies such as information systems high-level architecture and life cycle, information flow within organization, managerial decision making tools, data quality control and assurance, ethical and legal aspects of IS, and successful implementation of IS projects. Course Information: Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ACC 311 or equivalent, and ECO 315 or equivalent, and BUS 501. Peoria Cohort students must complete ACC 311 or equivalent and ECO 315 or equivalent prior to enrolling in this course. Core required course for MBA. Not accepted toward satisfaction of MIS program requirements. Access to the Internet is required. Restricted to Graduate and Doctoral - Springfield and Graduate - Peoria.

 

MIS 542. Management of Database Systems. 3 Hours.

Database design theory and development techniques are covered where the main focus is on the relational databases. Topics discussed include data modeling theories (entity-relationship diagrams) and theory implementation in CASE tools, data definition language to create physical databases in commercially available RDBMS such as Oracle 9i, data manipulation language and Structured Query language (SQL) to manage data within the database, client/server, distributed and Internet databases architectures, form and report design using Microsoft Access database. The main goal is to train the students to assume roles such as database analyst/designer or administrator throughout their professional career. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 552. System Analysis And Design. 3 Hours.

The overall goal of this course is to introduce students to a wide range of theoretical as well as practical techniques and methodologies in the area of information systems analysis and design. The course will train the students to assume roles such as systems analyst and technical project management in their career. The three most important topics addressed in the course are Analysis, Design, and Implementation of information systems where Systems Development Life Cycle, various diagramming techniques, and decision analysis concepts are discussed and practiced. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513 or equivalent. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 561. Competitive Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Explores the use of modern technology, including the Internet, to gain a competitive edge in the marketplace. Within the context of the need for having an adaptive organization, includes the examination of modern theories of competitive strategy, gathering and use of competitive intelligence, the role of the sales force in competitive strategy formulation and execution, and the ethics of competitive intelligence. Course Information: Open to non-majors if space is available, with permission of the instructor and their advisers. Access to the Internet required.

 

MIS 564. Data Communications and Networking. 3 Hours.

Telecommunications involve transmission of data, voice, image, and video over communication networks. This course covers the concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, and security for the design, implementation, and management of digital networks. Fundamental network concepts are introduced using a network model that divides data communications into multiple layers, such as application, network and transport, data link, and physical layer. Network technologies are covered in terms of different types of networks (i.e. local area networks {LAN}, backbone networks, wide area networks {WAN}, wireless networks, and the Internet). Network management and security are also emphasized. Course Information: Prerequisite:MIS 513 or equivalent.

 

MIS 566. Emerging Technologies & Issues. 3 Hours.

Understanding of the technologies used in the digitization of data, information, and communications and the implications of digitization on organizations and society. These technologies and implications are examined in regard to ethical issues such as information privacy, accessibility, property, and accuracy. The proliferations of computer crime as well as the legal and regulatory environment are examined. The ramifications of digitization as they affect individuals, organizations, and society. The impacts of globalization, sourcing, technology workforce and the digital divide are examined. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513 or equivalent. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 568. Business Process Management and Innovation. 3 Hours.

Provides a process-oriented view of the organization and its relationships with suppliers, customers, and competitors; processes as vehicles for achieving strategic objectives and transforming the organization; process analysis, design, implementation, control and monitoring; processes as a means of achieving compliance; impact on work; the role of enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply chain management (SCM), and customer relationship management (CRM) systems. The process continuum from structured to unstructured processes. Impact on work practices. The role of systems in transforming organizations and markets; global perspective. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513. Access to the internet is required.

 

MIS 570. Topics in Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

An advanced topic from the current literature of MIS. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 571. Electronic Commerce: Business Uses of the Internet. 3 Hours.

Tools and technologies needed for electronic commerce are reviewed. Business opportunities, challenges, and strategies for use of the information superhighway will be explored, as will strategies and vision on how to leverage the emerging national and global information infrastructure. Other topics include the impact of the emerging electronic market and commerce reengineering in today's corporations. Course Information: Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 573. Project and Change Management. 3 Hours.

Managing projects within an organizational context, including the processes related to initiating, planning, executing, controlling, reporting, and closing a project. Project integration, scope, time, cost, quality control, and risk management. Software size and cost estimation. Assigning work to programmer and other teams, monitoring progress and version control, managing the organizational change process. Identifying project champions, working with user teams, training, and documentation. The change management role of the IS specialist. The use of sourcing and external procurement; contracts and managing partner relationships. Students will be exposed to knowledge base needed for Project Management certification. Course Information: Prerequisite: BUS 322, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Open to non-MIS majors. Access to Internet is required. Restricted to Doctoral - Springfield, Graduate - Springfield.

 

MIS 567. Business Process Modeling and IT Governance. 3 Hours.

Provides participants with knowledge and skills in the concepts of managing technological change within for profit and not-for-profit types of organizations. Examines how information technology makes possible new business models, new organizational structures, and new management processes. Presents different approaches and current practices in dealing with the organizational and human aspects of effective technology transition initiatives. Topics covered include change management, new information technology-based business models, planning for technology transition, managing change agents, and managerial decisions about information technology. Major emphasis on discussion of current situations faced by today's organizations and extended case studies. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 513 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 577. MIS Design and Research Methods. 3 Hours.

The major objective of this course is to discuss fundamentals of MIS research and design science methodologies. The participants will learn how to conduct quantitative, qualitative, and design science research within the MIS context. Topics covered include methods for systematic literature review, gap identification, data collection and analysis, as well as interpretation and presentation of finding. After completing this course, participants should be able to conduct applied and/or theoretical MIS-related research. Course Information: Prerequisites: Introductory Statistics.

 

MIS 576. Data Warehousing. 3 Hours.

Data warehousing is an emerging technology within the IT industry. It provides an infrastructure to collect subject-oriented data for predefined strategic as well as tactical managerial decision making purposes such as planning, logistics and promotions. The main topics covered are dimensional modeling, Star and Snowflake scheme, data staging, logical and physical design and implementation, and query design. State-of-the-art database technologies are used to demonstrate and practice the concepts, methodologies, and techniques. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 542. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 578. Information Security. 3 Hours.

This course will cover both technical and non-technical aspects of information security. The technical part will cover information security threats, vulnerabilities and controls. The technical materials focus on concepts and principles rather than design and implementation. The non-technical part will cover risk management, security planning and disaster recovery, legal, ethical and professional issues. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 564. This is an MIS graduate level elective course. Access to the Internet is required.This course will cover both technical and non-technical aspects of information security. The technical part will cover information security threats, vulnerabilities and controls. The technical materials focus on concepts and principles rather than design and implementation. The non-technical part will cover risk management, security planning and disaster recovery, legal, ethical and professional issues. Course Information: Prerequisite: MIS 564. This is an MIS graduate level elective course. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 583. Graduate Project And Seminar. 3 Hours.

Closure experience involving an advanced problem or need in MIS; may or may not involve a practicum. Project topic must be approved in advance by the MIS Department Committee; written report and oral presentation required. Students are required to participate in a regularly scheduled seminar that covers the process of project design and methods in MIS. Access to the Internet is required. NOTE: If the project is not completed during the initial four-hour enrollment, students must register for MIS 586 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the project is completed. Course Information: Prerequisite: 24 hours of 500 level coursework in MIS. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 584. Capstone. 3 Hours.

Covers current topics in MIS including issues related to areas of business environment, technology, globalization, politics, ethics, legal, regulatory, and demographic diversity. The role of MIS in those areas will be addressed. In each semester, these selected topics may not be the same depending on what topics are current and emerging. Assignments include paper critiques, group discussions, and a final paper or project. This course is primarily for MIS majors and should be taken in the last semester of the MIS degree program. NOTE: If this course is not completed during the initial four-hour enrollment, students must register for the course and re-take it again. Course Information: Prerequisite: 24 hours of 500-level coursework in MIS. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 585. Thesis And Seminar. 6 Hours.

Academic study of a student-selected topic in MIS that involves a survey of relevant literature and empirical analysis. Thesis topic must be approved in advance by the MIS Department Committee; written report and oral presentation required. Students are required to participate in a regularly scheduled seminar that covers the process of conducting research in the field of MIS and phases of the research process. NOTE: If the thesis is not completed during the initial six-hour enrollment, students must register for MIS 587 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the thesis is completed. Course Information: Prerequisite: 24 hours of 500-level coursework in MIS. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 586. Graduate Project and Seminar Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for MIS 583. Course Information: May be repeated.

 

MIS 587. Thesis and Seminar Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for MIS 585. Course Information: May be repeated. Access to the Internet is required.

 

MIS 599. Tutorial. 1-3 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 3 hours. Access to the Internet is required.